‘The pain didn’t stop:’ Study looking into slow concussion recovery in youth

Kailey Lang mostly remembers the blinding headaches after a carefree trip down a waterslide at West Edmonton Mall in March left her with a concussion.The 14-year-old from Calgary was making her second trip down the giant slide when something happened.“It kind of went around in a loop and shot you out of the bottom. When I came out, I had this throbbing, kind of pounding pain in my head and I felt a little dizzy at first. And then the pain didn’t stop for a while,” Kailey said.“I don’t really remember hitting my head at all.”There was no quick recovery for Kailey, who was plagued with symptoms after she got home.“I started to get the headaches almost daily for a few weeks. And then I started taking this medication for seizures and then the really, really extreme headaches went away.”Kailey Lang, Jill BeatonKailey Lang relaxes with her mother Jill Beaton at the family farm after school, east of Calgary on Friday, Sept. 13, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Dave ChidleyKailey LangKailey Lang relaxes with her mother Jill Beaton at the family farm after school, east of Calgary on Friday, Sept. 13, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Dave ChidleyKailey LangKailey Lang relaxes with her mother Jill Beaton at the family farm after school, east of Calgary on Friday, Sept. 13, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Dave ChidleyKailey LangKailey Lang relaxes with her mother Jill Beaton at the family farm after school, east of Calgary on Friday, Sept. 13, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Dave Chidley
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