Parody of 1970s hit reminds individuals to act fast during stroke

By AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

The Village People’s legendary 1970s hit “Y.M.C.A.” gets some fresh lyrics.

A brand new music video in the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association requires a lighthearted method of recognizing probably the most common symptoms of the serious and existence-threatening condition — stroke.

Within the video, “Y.M.C.A.” becomes “F.A.S.T.,” a memory aid that means face drooping, arm weakness, speech difficulty, and time for you to call 911.

“Humor makes things simpler to keep in mind, and, obviously, adding body movements causes it to be a multisensory experience,” stated Mitchell S.V. Elkind, M.D., professor of neurology at Columbia College College of Physicians and Surgeons in New You are able to City.

Stroke affects nearly 800,000 Americans every year and it is a number one reason for serious lengthy-term disability.

Lee H. Schwamm, M.D., a professor of neurology at Harvard School Of Medicine in Cambridge, Massachusetts, stated he hopes the recording convinces individuals to react rapidly to stroke signs and symptoms.

“Every minute a stroke continues untreated, cognitive abilities are dying. So acting fast is our very best weapon against stroke,” he stated.

“The song is humorous, only in order to help people discover the signs and symptoms of stroke,” stated Schwamm, adding he hopes the humor winds up saving lives.

For those who have questions or comments relating to this story, please email [email protected]

American Heart Association News Tales

American Heart Association News covers cardiovascular disease, stroke and related health problems. Not every views expressed in American Heart Association News tales reflect the state position from the American Heart Association.

Copyright is owned or held through the American Heart Association, Corporation., and all sorts of legal rights are reserved. Permission is granted, free of charge and without requirement for further request, to connect to, quote, excerpt or reprint from all of these tales in almost any medium as lengthy as no text is altered and proper attribution is built to the American Heart Association News. See full relation to use.