Children get headaches — here’s what parents can do

Headaches are common for all age groups, but when a child gets one, it may be hard for them to communicate how they feel.Dr. Gerald Friedman, pediatrician and headache specialist based in Thornhill, Ont., told Global News headaches occur in children and increase in frequency when they reach adolescence.“Approximately 50 per cent of children will experience a headache during their childhood,” he said. “Migraine occurs in five to 10 per cent of children.”Story continues belowOlder children with headaches are capable to talk about how they feel.“For younger children with limited abilities to verbally communicate the parents should pay attention to episodes characterized by crying, appearing pale, vomiting and relief with sleep,” Friedman said.READ MORE: Boy, 14, dies of rare neurological disease after complaining of a headacheDr. Daune MacGregor, staff neurologist at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, explains some research indicates one in 11 children have headaches.“If you look overall and ask a school-aged population if they’ve had headaches, at least 60 per cent of them will tell you at some point in time they get it.”And while some adults who have headaches never go to their doctors, both experts added if your child is experiencing a headache, especially for the first time, parents and health professionals need to understand what’s going on.WATCH: How to tell if it’s a headache, migraine or brain aneurysm – and what to do next

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